Note from Eira, ProjectARCC resident caretaker – don’t forget about ProjectARCC representation (aka Project mARCCh) at today’s March for Science and next week’s People’s Climate March! If you’re in the New York City region, the good folks at the Interference Archive in Brooklyn will help you get marching ready!

Interference Archive Propaganda Party — April 23: Come gather material for the April 29 Climate March and May Day!
 

What is a propaganda party? It’s where we get together to make and share graphic and informational material that we can use in our organizing work. We’re excited to provide material at this event that you can use for the April 29th climate march, in your May Day organizing, and more.

Join us on April 23rd at Interference Archive! This is a time to meet people, learn about the work different organizations are doing, and pick up flyers, stickers, posters, buttons, and more. All this material is free to you, and we encourage you to grab a drink and meet some new people.

Why do we use the word “propaganda”? “Propaganda,” from the same root as “propagate,” refers to information that is shared in support of a cause. In modern times, the word propaganda has been weighted with negative connotations; we aim to reclaim the word. Our daily lives are saturated with supposedly “neutral” material that implicitly supports existing power structures. We use the word propaganda because we have no desire to feign neutrality. What thoughts, feelings, and messages would you like to propagate?

Who is invited? Everyone! Bring your friends if you’d like; come on your own to meet new friends. If you want to come on behalf of an organization that you work with, please feel free to bring any material that you’d like to distribute to help other people connect with your cause.

Who has this been organized with? Sowing Resistance has been organized with the following partner organizations: Amplifier Foundation, Kayrock Screenprinting, Print.Organize.Protest, Radio Free Gowanus, Radix, and Wasp Print.

Photo taken by 5chw4r7z at the Cincinnati Sanctuary City Rally, January 2017

So if you hang out in science or climate change circles, you probably know there are two BIG back-to-back marches coming up in the next ten days: on 4/22 there is the March for Science, and on 4/29 there is the People’s Climate March. Both marches aim to have a huge presence in Washington DC, accompanied by sister marches in many cities.

ProjectARCC is preparing for both of these marches by organizing to ensure LAM (Libraries, Archives, Museums) participation at both marches. We’re calling this Project mARCCh in recognition that as professionals charged with the preservation of cultural heritage, and an abiding commitment to information and knowledge access, we stand proudly in solidarity with our sisters and brothers who are at the forefront of information work around climate change, particularly scientists and journalists.

We’re keeping this pretty simple: if you are a librarian, archivist, or curator who would like to be a point of contact for an upcoming sister city march, we’d like to count you as a Project mARCCh point of contact. Contacts will be expected to serve as a local point of contact for organizing to increase the visibility and solidarity of LAM professionals at the 4/22 and 4/29 events. If you volunteer with Project mARCCh, you will be publicly identified on our website (on the map here) as the point of contact for your area. If you plan to remain local, we hope you will recruit other LAM professionals to attend sister city events. If you plan to come to DC, we will do our best to all congregate together.

If you would like to volunteer as a point of contact, please email Eira, the current ProjectARCC resident caretaker, the following information:

  • March:
  • Location (City, State):
  • Name:
  • Contact Info (Email and/or phone):

Please use the hashtag #project_mARCCh to tag pictures of you and your LAM colleagues in the streets so we can recognize you!

FAQ:

  • So wait, what do I have to do as a point of contact?
    • Think of local Project mARCCh points of contact similar to the hosts that often lead a restaurant outing at conferences – they typically say “Hey, meet us here at 8pm and we’ll go to the place together!” That is the bare minimum expectation – that you are willing to have your name and contact information listed on the Project mARCCh map so that if other LAM professionals in your area would like to march with other colleagues, they have that opportunity.

      Of course, you can take this as far as you want! Some points of contacts in other cities are making buttons that make puns about archivists and preservation, others are actually organizing carpools from their workplaces to go, and others are busy people who don’t have time to organize, but wanted to simply just have their name on the website just in case it turns out another librarian or archivist in their region wants someone to march with. If you make a kick ass banner, and take a picture of your LAM crew with it, Eira will find you and give you a big hug one day.

  • Are y’all documenting/archiving the marches?
    • Short answer, no. Right now, projectARCC does not have the capacity or bandwidth to organize this the way that archivists organized after the Women’s March. But if you know of any repositories documenting the marches, let us know! We’d love for you to guest author something on our blog!
  • What should we put on our posters or banners?
    • We encourage anything that serves as public identification of you/your group as a librarian/archivist/curator. It’s incredibly important that communities of scientists and frontline communities on climate issues know that we’re paying attention to their issues. Some ideas being batted around by current project mARCCh contacts are “Archivists Preserve” or depicting the Earth inside an archival records box. I bet you have awesome ideas!

 

 

Recap from the March 14, 2017 ProjectARCC conference call. Future meetings dates can be found here.

  • Introduction to ProjectARCC and welcome to phone call – Eira Tansey
  • Discussion concerning organizing contacts for Project mARCCh
    • ProjectARCC is preparing for the 4/22 March for Science and the 4/29 People’s Climate March, and organizing to ensure LAM (Libraries, Archives, Museums) representation at both marches. We’re calling this Project mARCCh in recognition that as professionals charged with the preservation of cultural heritage, and an abiding commitment to information and knowledge access, we stand proudly in solidarity with our sisters and brothers who are at the forefront of information work around climate change, particularly scientists and journalists.
    • Project mARCCh Organizers will be expected to serve as a local point of contact for organizing to increase the visibility and solidarity of LAM professionals at the 4/22 and 4/29 events. If you volunteer as a Project mARCCh organizer, you will be publicly identified on our website as the point of contact for your area. If you plan to remain local, we hope you will recruit other LAM professionals to attend sister city events. If you plan to come to DC, we will do our best to all congregate together.

Recap from the January 17, 2017 ProjectARCC conference call. Future meetings dates can be found here.

  • Introduction to ProjectARCC and welcome to phone call – Eira Tansey
  • Projects of interest to ARCChivists
  • Other upcoming events/ideas for collaboration
    • Several people on the call discussed an interest in putting together a virtual DataRescue event. Contact eira.tansey@uc.edu if you’re interested in future plans concerning this.
    • The 2nd Keeping History Above Water conference will take place again at the end of October 2017 in Annapolis. If you are interested in sponsorship, in submitting a speaker proposal, or being included in an advanced registration notice, please send your name, email and organization information to histpres@annapolis.gov

Today’s post is from Rachel Appel, Digital Projects & Services Librarian at Temple University.

From January 13-14th, I participated in DataRescue Philly at the University of Pennsylvania which was one event in a long series of DataRefuge grassroots events. These events are taking place in order to capture and archive federal environmental data for long-term access and preservation to combat the incoming administration’s efforts to deny climate change as well as the necessity to have ongoing management of digital data. The event was organized by the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities and the University of Pennsylvania Libraries.1 I was interested to learn more about data archiving because of my commitment to climate change awareness and action and to learn more about data archiving for a project I am working on to preserve civic data accessed through OpenDataPhilly.org.2

The first day acted as an orientation to data management and archiving and included a Teach-In on Data Refuge and Environmental Justice, DataRescue Guide Training, and Roundtable on DataRefuge Value and Vulnerability.

The second day was the DataRescue: A Creative Coding and Archive-a-thon. DataRescue Philly focused on archiving NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) data.3 There were six DataRefugePaths4 for participants to join:

  • Seeders: Enter seeds, or individual site URLs, into the Internet Archive’s End of Term Archive.5
  • Baggers: Bag breakdowns of web pages that are unable to be archived by the Internet Archive using the tool BagIt.6
  • Metadata: Work on descriptive metadata standard creation and data entering for bags.
  • Tool Builders: Create tools to assist the Baggers.
  • Storytelling: Capture the event on social media and developing documentation.
  • Long Trail: Strategize DateRefuge into the future.

I participated in the Metadata Path. I was one of the Guides for the group and my main role was to facilitate the group and develop a qualified Dublin Core metadata standard for descriptive metadata for bags that were then uploaded into an S3 Bucket and linked to from the DataRefuge CKAN Page (datarefuge.org). The hardest part was constructing a workflow with the Baggers and the S3 Bucket uploaders. Fortunately, the University of Michigan had developed a way to automate some preservation metadata into a JSON file.7 We then had to check against those fields, CKAN’s fields, and the fields we thought were pertinent to description and discovery. We developed a schema for CKAN and were able to work around the software’s limitations through adding custom fields. As soon as data had been bagged, we uploaded it to S3 and then created a record in CKAN, entering the metadata and linking to the file. This is still a work in progress and we hope to have a more streamlined workflow for future events to use and build upon. This is a model that can be applied to a number of fields, not just climate change.

At the end of the Archive-a-thon, we archived nearly 4,000 seeds and over 21GB of bagged data.

To learn more about the project please visit the Data Rescue Philly site at ppehlab.org/datarefuge or the GitHub repo at github.com/datarefugephilly. We are continuously working on updating the documentation.

List of upcoming DataRefuge events:

  • January 27-28, 2017 Ann Arbor: #DataRescueAnnArbor
  • February 4, 2017 New York: #DataRescueNYC
  • February 12, 2017 Boston: #DataRescueBoston

I would encourage everyone to try and attend these events, especially if one is hosted near you. You can bring a multitude of skills, technical and non-technical, and preserve climate data so we can still access it in the years to come.

phillydatarefuge-1
Photo Credit: Andrew Bergman. Co-organizers of DataRescue Philly: Margaret Janz, Patricia Kim, Laurie Allen, and Bethany Wiggin.
phillydatarefuge-2
Photo Credit: Michelle Murphy. Metadata team! Justin Schell (Bagger), Delphine Khanna, Rachel Appel, and Anastasia Chiu.
phillydatarefuge-3
Photo Credit: Margaret Janz. Workflows.

[1] DataRescue Philly http://www.ppehlab.org/datarefugephilly/

[2] Future-Proofing Civic Data Knight Foundation https://www.newschallenge.org/challenge/how-might-libraries-serve-21st-century-information-needs/winning/future-proofing-civic-data

[3] NOAA http://www.noaa.gov/

[4] DataRefuge Paths http://www.ppehlab.org/datarefugepaths

[5] End of Term Archive http://eotarchive.cdlib.org/

[6] BagIt How-to https://github.com/datarefugephilly/bagit-how-to

[7]Data Package Requirements https://docs.google.com/document/d/17vQ6GOIs8aKUex7JdDzPy0QWPW7n2wZISMvz9A8fxG0/edit

Post by Eira Tansey

It is imperative that archivists and our allies who care about climate change educate ourselves as much as possible about the current landscape of federal records, research data, and open government initiatives. There have been a lot of concerns raised about the continuing availability of federal climate change research data, as well as continued access to government webpages. ProjectARCC applauds the work of all of our colleagues who are working to raise awareness to the vulnerability of climate data, particularly the work of our friends at DataRefuge.

This post is part of an ongoing series to educate our professional community on what to prepare for in terms of climate change, environmental regulation, and recordkeeping during the transition to the next presidential administration. The focus of this post will be on agency open government efforts. ProjectARCC also recommends the agency forecasts put together by the Environmental Data and Governance Initiative.

What has been the progress on open-government initiatives to date within these agencies, and what work is left to be done?

Although the Obama administration will be ending with a mixed record on transparency, the Obama administration introduced many very important changes intended to foster open government. Since President Obama took office, a number of directives intended to promote Open Government Initiatives were issued, including the Open Government Directive (M-10-06), the Managing Government Records Directive (M-12-18) and Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research (OSTP Memo of February 22, 2013), and Making Open and Machine Readable the New Default for Government Information Executive Order 13642.

All of these have implications for general principles of open government, transparency, and access to data (whether it’s governmental data, or scientific data created outside the government, but funded by federal dollars). While a deep exploration of the various open government initiatives is beyond the scope of this blog post, here’s a quick look at highlights of what agencies which have environmental-related work in their mission are doing. Per the Open Government Directive issued in 2010, agencies are required to maintain a webpage documenting their steps to comply with the various open government requirements. A full list can be found here.

Please note all links below were working as of the afternoon of January 18, 2017. However, over the course of working on this post I noticed some URLs had already changed from early drafts. I have nominated many of these URLs to the End of Term archive, but I would urge you to also nominate them as well, and save any local copies of PDFs or webpages you may want to refer to later. I would advise you to save local copies sooner rather than later given that the new administration will be taking office in 2 days.

Environmental Protection Agency https://www.epa.gov/open

The last EPA open government plan was issued in September 2016.

Data highlights:
Open data currently offered by the Environmental Protection Agency can be found at https://edg.epa.gov/metadata/catalog/main/home.page. The report goes into great detail about EPA’s approach to developing an information management policy to be compliant with the Open Government directives, as well as plans to develop a data lifecycle plan in FY17.

Records Management and FOIA highlights:
EPA is currently investigating email archiving tools based on role or content, and is also evaluating open-source or cloud-based” records management systems in anticipation of the 2019 deadline laid out in the Managing Government Records directive (https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/memoranda/2012/m-12-18.pdf). EPA FOIA requests can be tracked online, and the most recent Open Government report includes an objective to reduce backlog requests by 10%. The records management page for the EPA can be found here: https://www.epa.gov/records More information on EPA FOIA is here: https://www.epa.gov/foia

Department of the Interior https://www.doi.gov/open

The last DOI open government plan report was issued in June 2014.

Data highlights:
Open data currently offered by the Department of the Interior can be found at https://data.doi.gov/dataset A major initiative towards transparency within the DOI has been the establishment of the US Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative. According to the DOI, EITI is ” voluntary, global effort designed to strengthen accountability and public trust for the revenues paid and received for a country’s oil, gas and mineral resources. Countries that follow the standard publish a report in which governments and companies publicly disclose royalties, rents, bonuses, taxes and other payments from oil, gas, and mining resources.” (https://www.doi.gov/eiti)
The 2016 EITI Exective Summary Report can be found here.

Records Management and FOIA highlights:
According to the 2014 report, many records retention schedules are in the process of consolidation, and migration work had started on several records systems. The records management page for the Department of Interior can be found here: https://www.doi.gov/ocio/policy-mgmt-support/information-and-records-management/records More information on DOI FOIA is here: https://www.doi.gov/foia

Department of Energy http://energy.gov/open-government

The last Department of Energy open government plan was issued in September 2016.

Data highlights:
Open data currently offered by the Department of Energy can be found at https://www.data.gov/energy/. There is also significant data available through the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) at http://www.eia.gov/tools/. One of the more interesting tools on the EIA website is the real-time tracker documenting power demands on the US electrical grid (http://www.eia.gov/beta/realtime_grid/#/summary/demand?end=20161213&start=20161113).

Records Management and FOIA highlights:
According to the 2016 report, the Department of Energy has opted to use the Capstone method for agency email. The records management page for the Department of Energy can be found here: http://energy.gov/cio/office-chief-information-officer/services/guidance/records-management More information on Department of Energy FOIA is here: http://energy.gov/management/office-management/operational-management/freedom-information-act

National Aeronautics and Space Administration https://open.nasa.gov/

The last National Aeronautics and Space Administration open government plan was issued in September 2016.

Data highlights:
Open data currently offered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) can be found at https://open.nasa.gov/open-data/ (this portal takes you to open data, open code, APIs, and other resources). All research produced with NASA funding is now required to be deposited in the NASA research repository within a year, and is available at PubSpace: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/funder/nasa/

Records Management and FOIA highlights:
The records management page for NASA can be found here: https://www.nasa.gov/content/nasa-records-management More information on NASA FOIA: https://www.nasa.gov/FOIA/index.html NASA maintains a FOIA library of available documents of interest to the public (as determined by frequent requests): http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/FOIA/err.htm You may be interested in reading the NASA Transition Binder: https://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/FOIA/Transition_Binder.pdf

Department of Commerce (which oversees the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency [NOAA])** 

**As far as I could find, there is not a dedicated Open Government office for NOAA, so I reviewed the Open Government initiative documents for the Department of Commerce. This can be found here: http://www.osec.doc.gov/opog/OG/default.htm

The last National Aeronautics and Space Administration open government plan was issued in September 2016. Pages 111-121 concern the activities of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency.

Data highlights:
Open data currently offered by NOAA can be found at https://data.noaa.gov/dataset. Interesting NOAA data highlights include their efforts to assign DOIs to datasets that are in the National Center for Environmental Information. NOAA is also responsible for maintaining climate.gov.

Records Management and FOIA highlights:
The records management page for NOAA can be found here: http://www.corporateservices.noaa.gov/audit/records_management/ More information on NOAA FOIA: http://www.noaa.gov/foia-freedom-of-information-act NOAA maintains a FOIA reading room, including links to frequerntly requested records: http://www.noaa.gov/foia-reading-room

Recap from the December 13, 2016 ProjectARCC conference call. Future meetings dates can be found here.

  • Introduction to ProjectARCC and welcome to phone call – Eira Tansey
  • Explanation of recent changes made to ProjectARCC and departure from the original committee structure  – Casey Davis
  • Things to keep an eye on with the next administration – Eira Tansey
    • EPA and Monitoring/Regulatory/Research Agencies
    • Continuing access to federal climate research data (see this story)
    • Open Government/Transparency Initiatives
  • Projects of interest to ARCChivists
    • Ben from Penn State discussed his Fracking Documentation Project. You can access collection here and if anyone want to help archive pipeline-related activism, check this out
    • Michelle from University of Toronto shared updates from the Guerrilla Archiving effort
    • Bethany and Laurie from Penn shared updates from #DataRefuge
  • Areas for collaboration
    • Allana would like to write about archives divesting/investing in climate-friendly activities (e.g. vendors, technology, banking). If you want to work with her, get in touch